Horst: Photographer of Style

Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 6th September 2014- 4th January 2015

‘Your photographs are sheer genius and delight my soul … each one is perfect by itself.’ Main Rousseaur Bocher (1890-1976)

These were the words expressed by the famous haute couture designer, decades after Horst P. Horst (1906-1999) produced his most acclaimed photograph Mainbocher Corset (1939). The picture, erotic and mysterious, reveals the photographer’s classical sculpture influences.

One of the greatest fashion photographers of the 20th century, Horst P. Horst, captured the image of Hollywood’s brightest stars “the new royalty” during the 1930s, amongst them where Rita Heyworth, Bette Davis, Vivian Leigh, Noël Coward, Ginger Rogers, Marline Dietrich and Joan Crawford. During the Post war period, he photographed every First Lady of the USA.

mainbocher_corsetMainbocher Corset (pink satin corset by Detolle), Paris, 1939. © Condé Nast:Horst Estate

mainbocher_corsetMainbocher Corset (pink satin corset by Detolle), Paris, 1939. © Condé Nast:Horst Estate

A major retrospective featuring a total of 250 images from all stages of his highly influential 60-year career, is on display at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. The exhibition celebrates Horst work at the heart of the fashion industry in Paris and New York. It uses a selection of Haute Couture garments, film, and magazines, offering an exciting insight into the world of glamour that surrounded the life of the visual artist.

The German born American citizen was the creator of more than 90 Vogue covers and collaborated with Coco Chanel for several decades. Photography, design, theatre, fashion, art and high society were the world he inhabited, while he played and important role in shaping the photographic aesthetic of his era.
Acclaimed for his dramatic use of light he became one of the first photographers to perfect new color techniques in the 1930s.
The exhibition displays vintage photographs from the archive of Paris Vogue alongside garments by Channel, Lavin, Molyneux and Vionnet.

The Surrealist art movement looked into ways of interpreting the life turning to dreams and the unconscious for inspiration and expression.
During the 1930s Surrealism left its radical avant-garde roots to serve for the transformation and innovation in the fields design, fashion, advertising, theatre and film.
Horst’s photographs of this period feature mysterious, whimsical and surreal elements combined with his classical aesthetic. The exhibition explores his studies and collaborations with Salvador Dali and Elsa Schiapareli.

Victoria and Albert Museum, London 6 de septiembre al 04 de enero http://www.vam.ac.uk

“Tus fotografías son pura genialidad y deleitan mi alma … cada una es perfecta en sí misma”. Main Rousseaur Bocher (1890-1976)

Las palabras expresadas por el famoso diseñador de alta costura, décadas después de Horst P. Horst (1906-1999) produjese la aclamada fotografía “Corsé Mainbocher” (1939). La imagen, erótica y misteriosa, revela las influencias de escultura clásica en el fotógrafo.

Durante la década de 1930 Horst P. Horst, fotografió a las estrellas más brillantes de Hollywood ” la nueva realeza “, Rita Heyworth, Bette Davis, Vivian Leigh, Noël Coward, Ginger Rogers, Merlin Dietrich y Joan Crawford. Durante el período de la post-guerra el fotógrafo captura la imagen de cada una de las Primera Dama de los EE.UU.

El ciudadano estadounidense de origen alemán fue el creador de más de 90 portadas de Vogue y colaboró ​​con Coco Channel durante varias décadas.

Aclamado por su uso dramático de la luz se convirtió en uno de los primeros fotógrafos en perfeccionar nuevas técnicas de color.

Durante la década de 1930 el movimiento de arte surrealista dejó sus raíces radicales de vanguardia para ponerse al servicio de la transformación del diseño, la moda, la publicidad, el teatro y el cine. La exposición en al VAM explora los estudios y colaboraciones de Horst con Salvador Dalí y Elsa Schiapareli.

http://www.vam.ac.uk

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